2016 Archive

This page presents archived content from “Communicating Ciencia: Adapting to the Changing Faces and Voices of Mass Media” prepared for ScienceWriters2016 in San Antonio, Texas.


¿Cómo SciWri?

As our nation’s cultural voices evolve, how do we as science writers adjust our craft to connect with today’s bicultural and bilingual audiences?

Using the U.S. Latino and Hispanic experience as a focusing lens, our ScienceWriters2016 session will explore the nuances and approaches journalists and PIOs can consider to better communicate science in the United States — no matter what our audience’s cultural context might be.

Session Slides | Session Activity Sheet


About

Welcome! This website was created for the Communicating Ciencia (#CómoSciWrisession presented at ScienceWriters2016, the annual workshop of the National Association of Science Writers.

Communicating Ciencia: Adapting to the Changing Voices of Mass Media
Saturday, October 29th
9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. CDT
Concepción, 2nd Floor (Floor Map)
Omni La Mansión del Rio
San Antonio, Texas
www.sciencewriters2016.org/sessions/a1-communicating-ciencia-adapting-changing-voices-mass-media


Organizers

Ben Young Landis
Writer/Creator, cr8xt
Executive Chair, Capital Science Communicators
@younglandis | LinkedIn

Becky Oskin
Science Writer, Math and Physical Sciences, University of California, Davis
Professional Membership Chair, Capital Science Communicators
@beckyoskin | LinkedIn


Session Abstract

As our nation’s cultural voices evolve, how do we as science writers adjust our craft to connect with today’s bicultural and bilingual audiences?

Using the U.S. Latino and Hispanic experience as a focusing lens, this guided discussion and interactive activity will explore the nuances and approaches journalists and PIOs can consider to better communicate science in the United States — no matter what our audience’s cultural context might be.

We’ll tug at the practical implications of language, history, and society for the bicultural communicator — and ask ourselves: “Does this pass the abuela test?”


Session Mission

To come away with ideas and insights to better communicate science to bicultural audiences in the United States.


Session Learning Objectives

  1. Participants can distinguish language, historical, and social nuances when communicating science to bicultural audiences.
  2. Participants can identify existing resources, networks, and leaders for bilingual and bicultural science communication around the U.S.
  3. Participants will engage in a fun and thoughtful learning experience.

Session Philosophy

You might have noticed we doubled-down — tripled, really — on speakers with education experience.

At the heart it, we’re all science writers because we want to educate others — and educators have firsthand experience expressing information to multiple audiences and assessing learning success. That’s why in a complex, nuanced discussion such as communicating science in bicultural/bilingual contexts, we wanted to approach the topic from its essential philosophical foundations in education — then weave back to mass media communication and marketing.

So,  our education professionals will anchor one end of our expertise spectrum, in José and Robin. On the other end of the spectrum will be the journalist’s perspective, in Aleszu. And helping bridge the middle would be Claudia, who has experience in education, marketing, and public information, integrating the full spectrum.

And of course, Ben and Becky will keep eyes and ears on our conversation to help bridge any contextual gaps between our speakers and our NASW audience.

 


#CómoSciWri | #SciWri16